OPM signs up Integic for RSM project

The Office of Personnel Management put in place the last piece for its long-awaited Retirement Systems Modernization project when it tapped Integic of Chantilly, Va., to digitize federal employee retirement records.

The $12.8 million contract is for three months and an option year. A second option year, if picked up, will cost $14.5 million.

Integic is a subsidiary of Northrop Grumman Corp.

The award is the last of three contracts for the massive RSM project, a long-awaited program that will eventually give federal employees and retirees open and immediate access to their retirement-related records and benefit elections.

OPM in May awarded Hewitt Associates of Lincolnshire, Ill., a $290 million, 10-year contract to create a database that will let employees view their working history and salary, calculate retirement benefits and model retirement benefits by projecting years of employment and future salary increases.

Several weeks later, the agency tapped consulting firm Accenture for a $40 million contract that will provide more efficient IT and business systems to expedite how retirees receive retirement benefit checks.

Under the new contract, Integic will be responsible for converting retirement-related paper records on all active federal employees into electronic form, which will feed into the larger RSM database. Once in the database, the information will be available for employees to view online.

'This agreement will help OPM gather the data needed to electronically process retirement claims and introduce new planning tools for employees,' OPM director Linda Springer said. 'With the ability to get a complete online view of retirement data, employees and [human resources] officials will have an advantage when planning career milestones.'

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