Navy flight training deal takes off with L-3

The U.S. Navy has awarded L-3 Communications Inc. a $32 million contract for a flight simulation and training package.

L-3's Link and Simulation Training division will supply four F/A-18E/F Super Hornet tactical operational flight trainers, instructor operator stations, briefing and debriefing systems, training and onsite tactical services.

L-3 built the trainers to comply with a Navy master plan for aviation simulations. The trainers are the first of the Super Hornet configuration to feature brief and debrief capability and an enhanced, high-fidelity sensor video recording system that records, plays back and distributes data and communications for review following a training exercise.

The trainers also offer a simulated, joint helmet system that gives the pilot and weapons system officer a targeting system that they can use to control sensors and weapons through visual cueing.

The Naval Air Warfare Center in Orlando, Fla., and the Boeing Co. of Chicago selected the L-3 unit to handle the work. The contract value could reach $45 million if the Navy decides to order additional tactical trainers, L-3 said.

L-3 will deliver two trainers to the Naval Air Station at Lemoore, Calif., and another two trainers to the Naval Air Station at Oceana, Va.

William Welsh is the deputy editor of Government Computer News' affiliate publication, Washington Technology.

About the Author

William Welsh is a freelance writer covering IT and defense technology.

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