CMS Watch: SharePoint not Web optimized

Agencies and departments would be well advised to look carefully before deploying Microsoft's SharePoint Server as a general purpose Web content-management solution, according to the latest semi-annual content management report offered by analyst firm CMS Watch.

"SharePoint has always been a good platform for managing Office documents and the new version is even better at that. But managing Web content represents a very different challenge, and here, Microsoft has not hit the mark," said CMS Watch founder Tony Byrne.

Specifically, the report warns that Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007, like most portal software, generates non-standard HTML that can be an issue for organizations wanting to employ standards-based designs. Also, SharePoint's folder-based navigation doesn't comply with traditional Web navigation standards, and the product offers very limited support for translation workflows.

'MOSS 2007 might make sense for certain document-heavy Intranets," Byrne said, "but prospective customers should not assume that its ease of deployment for simple file sharing will equate to ease of implementation for managing complex Web publishing operations ' for Web content management.'

Microsoft declined to speak with GCN on the matter, though a Microsoft spokesperson did issue a statement saying that 'We, as well as our customers, disagree with the CMS Watch assessment as the report makes assertions that are based on a limited understanding of the product.'

About the Author

Patrick Marshall is a freelance technology writer for GCN.

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