Customs automates workers' comp filing

Paper system gives way to online processing

The Homeland Security's Department's U.S. Customs and Border Protection directorate is automating its workers' compensation procedures to lower costs, centralize and streamline processing procedures, and improve customer service.

The agency will be using Herdon, Va.-based MicroPact Engineering's online entelliTrack Workers' Comp software, specifically designed for governmental workers' compensation programs. The one-year contract is valued at approximately $300,000.

EntelliTrack Workers' Comp replaces a paper-based spreadsheet system. "The Workers' Comp edition cuts claims processing time to a fraction of what it takes to file and process a claim manually," said MicroPact's Growson Edwards, vice president of business development.

Employees injured on the job can file claims online, and managers will be able to approve the claims online. Once the claims are filed, they are sent simultaneously to the labor relations offices at Customs and the Labor Department. Employees will know the claims have been received, and because the offices will have the claims immediately, they will be able to process them faster.

The agency will also be able to compile and analyze statistics such as the average claim resolution time and processing cost, thereby lowering costs, the company said. CBP's plans call for activation of the software this month, MicroPact said.

About the Author

Kathleen Hickey is a freelance writer for GCN.

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