Technicalities | 3-D in the picture

For decades, a lot of technological wonders that have become
everyday items have grown out of government research and programs.
Examples include the Internet and any number of innovations spun
off from the space program. That’s likely to continue, but
we’re also seeing everyday gadgets and games become potential
tools for the government.


In February, we noted that a physics professor had built a
homegrown mini-supercomputer out of eight Cell Broadband Engine
processors for Sony PlayStation 3 gaming consoles (GCN.com,
GCN.com/1136). More recently, an Energy Department agency used
the same kind of processors in building the world’s first
petaflop supercomputer (GCN.com/1137).


Now, Infosys promises the ability to send 3-D video, games and
other images to holographic handsets similar to cell phones.
Infosys says the holographic handsets, which will be available in
two years, will be able to capture and send 3-D images without
losing resolution.


Chipsets in the devices would use algorithms called Fourier
transformations to build a 3-D image from a series of 2-D photos,
according to online news outlet CNET.com.


Infosys likely will be looking for a lot of consumer use, but
the company also expects to target government and other official
users. Anyone from building inspectors and accident investigators
to emergency crews and doctors could find good uses for such a
technology. And they could play those dandy 3-D games during
downtime.



About the Author

Kevin McCaney is a former editor of Defense Systems and GCN.

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