TECH BRIEF

Adobe offers new LiveCycle suite

PDF maker talks about push into government services

Adobe is making a push further into the government space, with the release this week of LiveCycle Enterprise Suite 2. The software will provide what the company calls a “rich Internet applications framework” for building workspaces, mobile and desktop access to applications and deployment in the cloud.

The Adobe product has been used by social services call centers to set up benefits for welfare recipients. It used to take weeks to determine a person’s eligibility for government assistance, said Rob Pinkerton, Adobe's director of public services. Adobe LiveCycle helped government workers collect information faster, with the result that it reduced the average time to receive benefits from 26 days to six days, he said.

The company built some enhanced usability features and dashboards into LiveCycle. Users say “it made them feel more like public servants than bureaucrats,” Pinkerton said.

LiveCycle ES2 integrates more tightly with the Flash platform and PDF tools, the company said. Developers can extend their existing enterprise applications by using what Adobe calls “tiles,” which it describes as context-aware user interface components that can be assembled to create views that best server the user’s needs.

LiveCycle ES2 also can be adapted to run on iPhone, BlackBerry and Windows Mobile devices, Adobe representatives said.

About the Author

Trudy Walsh is a senior writer for GCN.

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