Turkey arrests 32 Anonymous hackers; group strikes back at Spain

The battle between the hacker group Anonymous and several national governments appears to be escalating.

Turkey’s Anadolu Agency, the government’s news agency, reported June 13 that Turkish authorities had arrested 32 Anonymous members in 12 cities in connection with attacks on government websites, Computerworld reported.

Anonymous had said the attacks were a protest against Turkey’s plans to filter Internet browsing beginning in August, according to the group’s AnonOps Communications website. Turkish officials have said the move is designed to protect young users from harmful content.

The arrests in Turkey followed Spain’s arrest of three suspected Anonymous members for attacks on the country’s second biggest bank and the Italian company that owns the Spanish power company Endesa, Bloomberg reported.

Anonymous responded to those arrests with an attack June 11 that shut down Spain’s national police website for several hours, according to CNET.

The attacks on Turkey’s government sites, launched June 9, were distributed denial-of-service attacks using “a coordinated network of Low Orbit Ion Canons (LOICs),” Anonymous said on its site.

Although LOICs are effecting in carrying out such an attack, that method is fairly easy to trace, CNET reported.

Anonymous also has been involved in attacks elsewhere, including a DDOS attack on Sony that Sony says provided cover for breaches that exposed personal information on more than 100 million users of its PlayStation network and Qriocity music service.

Anonymous also has reportedly attacked government websites of Iran, Egypt, Libya and Algeria.

About the Author

Kevin McCaney is a former editor of Defense Systems and GCN.

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