Which OS will users choose for their next smart phone?

Google's Android platform seems likely to remain the most popular choice among smart phone users.

When Connected Intelligence, a New York-based analytic group that studies the consumer handheld market, asked smart phone users which OS they were likely to chose for their next phone, Android led the way, being picked by 63 percent of respondents.

Meanwhile, Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 OS is making some progress, but appears to have a brand-recognition problem. Although 44 percent of current smart-phone users said they are considering buying a Windows Phone 7 device in the future, another 45 percent said they aren't even aware of the OS. 

"The Android juggernaut continues, and that's not great news for some of their OS competitors," said Linda Barrabee, research director for Connected Intelligence, in a press release. "For example, one-third of BlackBerry smartphone owners are most interested in Android for their next smartphone purchase."

Similar numbers arose with consumers who answered that they were not looking at Microsoft's platform for their next device purchase. Fifty percent of respondents who said they were planning to purchase a smartphone, but are not planning on going the Windows Phone 7 route, said the number one reason for their choice was the lack of knowledge in the platform.

"Windows Phone 7 has a way to go before consumers really understand what it is," Barrabee said. "But with the right marketing mojo, apps portfolio, and feature-rich hardware, Microsoft could certainly improve its standing and chip away at Android's dominant market position."

It is unclear on how the Windows Phone 7.5 update, code-named "Mango," will affect consumer interest. Microsoft may start rolling out new devices featuring the revised OS starting next week.

About the Author

Chris Paoli is the associate Web editor for 1105 Enterprise Computing Group's Web sites, including Redmondmag.com, RCPmag.com, ADTmag.com and VirtualizationReview.com.

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