IBM’s cloud-based X-Force Exchange fosters sharing of cyber threat intelligence among contributing organizations.

What 700 TB of cyber threat data can do for you

The value of cyber threat intelligence increases as it’s shared.

That’s the idea behind the X-Force Exchange, a 700-terabyte platform of aggregated cyber threat information IBM has built to foster cybersecurity collaboration. This hoard of cybercrime data features IBM’s security intelligence research, a global network of third-party threat data, expert analyses and real-time insight on live attacks, all on a social sharing site built on IBM's cloud.  

As the sophistication of cybercrime increases, governments and private organizations alike depend on sharing their threat intelligence. “The need for trusted threat intelligence is greater than ever, as 80 percent of cyber attacks are driven by highly organized crime rings in which data, tools and expertise are widely shared,” IBM said, citing a 2013 UNODC Comprehensive Study on Cybercrime.

IBM has described the  X-Force Exchange as “one of the largest and most complete catalogs of vulnerabilities in the world.” In detail, the platform will pull from threat data and intelligence based on more than 15 billion security events a day, over 25 billion web pages, more than 8 million spam and phishing attacks, a malware threat intelligence network of 270 million endpoints and reputation stats on a million malicious IP addresses that are categorized by geo-location and severity, the company said.

The cloud will continuously be updated -- it can add 1,000 malicious indicators each hour -- and as the third-party user base grows, so too will the depth of information, IBM said. Users can work with industry peers, analysts, researchers and trusted technology on a social interface with clearly organized tools, annotated findings and prioritized information. A library of application programming interfaces even works as an open forum for programmatic queries between businesses, machines and applications for further threat-fighting support.

In some ways, the platform looks like any other community social sharing site. Logged-in users can search, comment, collect and share information, while guests can view and search reports.

In the “activity” section, users can access recent vulnerabilities, find links to security intelligence blogs for helpful tips and search through trending topics and recent history of the entire community. In a personalized collections tab, users can add reports and pull in evidence from external resources, made shareable to the community or kept private.

IBM created the massive database for a community that wants to share, learn and work together to fight cybercrime at a global level.  “By inviting the industry to join our efforts and share their own intelligence, we’re aiming to accelerate the formation of the networks and relationships we need to fight hackers," said IBM Security’s Brendan Hannigan.

About the Author

Amanda Ziadeh is a Reporter/Producer for GCN.

Prior to joining 1105 Media, Ziadeh was a contributing journalist for USA Today Travel's Experience Food and Wine site. She's also held a communications assistant position with the University of Maryland Office of the Comptroller, and has reported for the American Journalism Review, Capitol File Magazine and DC Magazine.

Ziadeh is a graduate of the University of Maryland where her emphasis was multimedia journalism and French studies.

Click here for previous articles by Ms. Ziadeh or connect with her on Twitter: @aziadeh610.


inside gcn

  • data architecture (Quardia/Shutterstock.com)

    AI adoption: Don't ignore the fundamentals

Reader Comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group