Brother debuts compact, full-page mobile printer for public safety

Brother debuts compact, full-page mobile printer for public safety

Police squad cars are morphing into high-tech mobile offices, but officers still need to print. To make printing faster and easier in small spaces, Brother Mobile Solutions has launched the PocketJet 7 full-page mobile printer targeting public safety employees.

The small, compact PocketJet 7 mobile thermal printer prints full-size traffic citations, tickets, Amber Alerts and accident report on-site from any device.

The PocketJet 7  works with smartphones and tablets, running iOS, Android, Windows and Windows Mobile operating systems and can print images and Microsoft Word, Excel or PDF documents from officers’ PCs, handhelds or from many tablets or smartphones.

The printers can easily connect via USB to vehicle-mounted laptops. Some models offer wireless connectivity via Wi-Fi Direct or Bluetooth technology for out-of-the-box printing without additional apps or drivers. The PocketJet 7 Series mobile printers print at up to 8 pages per minute, feature a longer battery life than previous models and do not require ink cartridges.

Ultimately, the PocketJet 7’s graphics capability and full-page size can help speed apprehension, reduce identification problems, provide clearer documentation of accident and crime scenes, enhance driver-information exchanges and print detailed maps, directions and more.

“The most important benefit is the increased safety of public safety officers, whether on highway patrol or out in the field,” said Raul Palacios, senior product manager for Brother Mobile Solutions. “Using advanced electronic and printing solutions, they can complete the task and get back on the job quickly to minimize the risk to themselves, motorists and the public at large.”

About the Author

Amanda Ziadeh is a Reporter/Producer for GCN.

Prior to joining 1105 Media, Ziadeh was a contributing journalist for USA Today Travel's Experience Food and Wine site. She's also held a communications assistant position with the University of Maryland Office of the Comptroller, and has reported for the American Journalism Review, Capitol File Magazine and DC Magazine.

Ziadeh is a graduate of the University of Maryland where her emphasis was multimedia journalism and French studies.

Click here for previous articles by Ms. Ziadeh or connect with her on Twitter: @aziadeh610.


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