Air Force seeks software for distributed adaptive planning

Air Force seeks software for distributed adaptive planning

The Air Force Research Laboratory's Information Directorate seeks software that will allow distributed users to autonomously assess Air Force operations, identify deviations from plans and recommend adjustments during periods of reduced communications.

Air Force officials, like their counterparts in other military services, believe warfare is increasingly multifaceted and involves the ability to disrupt an information environment. In the event that a command and control system is hindered by anti-access/area denial (A2/AD) efforts, the service wants its software to keep operations running.

The goals of the broad R&D efforts described in the announcement, dubbed the Distributed Operations program, are to fill technology gaps for planning, execution and assessment and to apply those capabilities within a distributed architecture to boost resiliency.

"By developing these capabilities and achieving this goal, AFRL expects an order-of-magnitude improvement in the duration of maintaining continuity of air, space and cyber operations at a forward node subject to contested communications," the document states.

Respondents are asked to consider the Air Force's Theater Air Control System and Theater Air Ground System as examples of operational environments for candidate technologies.

The program’s total funding is expected to be $9.9 million through fiscal 2019, with close to half ($4.5 million) being awarded in fiscal 2018.

Click here to read the announcement.

This article originally appeared on FCW, a sister site to GCN.

About the Author

Sean Lyngaas is a former FCW staff writer.

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