Oregon wants to make online marijuana regulation a chill experience

Microsoft gets into the marijuana business

Microsoft is bringing its cloud computing solutions to the growing market for government-regulated marijuana sales.

The Redmond, Wash.-based software giant is teaming up with the tech startup Kind Financial’s government solutions division to provide state and local governments with a cloud-based service to "track and trace" cannabis through the entire growth, distribution and sales process. 

More Info

Alaska faces rough terrain with marijuana regulation

A small population scattered over vast areas, often without Internet access, makes effective systems especially tricky. Read more.

Oregon wants to make online marijuana regulation a chill experience

The state is trying to create an online marijuana license and registration system that is a little more IRS and a little less SWAT team. Read more.

State marijuana regulation: Is there a standard for the systems?

A more open monitoring system would give both the Justice Department and the states documentation on what’s working and what’s not. Read more.

According to a June 16 announcement, the Kind service is called Agrisoft Seed to Sale for Government, and will be offered on Microsoft's Azure Government platform.  

Though 25 states have legalized marijuana sales in some form, many large companies have been reluctant to get into the business.  That has limited the solutions available to states seeking to implement track and trace systems, and complicated efforts to comply with government regulations for medical privacy and information security.  In the announcement, Microsoft Executive Director State and Local Government Solutions Kimberly Nelson, said, "Azure Government is the only cloud platform designed to meet government standards for the closely regulated cannabis compliance programs and we look forward to working together to help our government customers launch successful regulatory programs."

Other solutions are available, however. New York state has worked with Oracle to track marijuana patients, as part of a program mandated by that state's Compassionate Care Act of 2014.  Oregon and Maine are among the states now tracking plants from seed-to-sale online, and Alaska -- which has struggled with regulation in the past -- recently signed a contract for its seed-to-sale tracking.

About the Author

Derek Major is a former reporter for GCN.

inside gcn

  • prisoner using a cellphone (FBI)

    Cellphone jammer targets illicit calls by prisoners

Reader Comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group