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White House announces new smart city funding

The White House has announced more than $80 million in new funding for smart cities research and projects across the county.

The new money includes $15 million for studying how communities can handle energy and climate issues.  There is another $15 million for transportation projects, and $10 million going toward public safety.

One project highlighted in the announcement is a National Science Foundation-funded effort to understand networks of connected and autonomous vehicles in Chattanooga, Tenn. Another project is looking at how first responders can best use predictive analytics from sensors to issue alerts and warning during floods.

Federal agencies including the NSF and the National Institute of Standards and Technology also unveiled their own initiatives to fund smart city technologies in locations across the country.  This includes NIST working toward an Internet of Things-Enabled Smart City Framework.

“The public working group seeks to benefit from lessons learned by pioneers of smart city implementations to distill a composable Smart City Framework,” a white paper on the project reads. “By composable, we imply that continuous integration and improvement would be achieved through graceful addition of functions as opposed to wholesale replacement or retrofitting.”

NSF, meanwhile, plans to invest $24.5 million in FY17 under the Smart and Connected Cities Program, which includes $8.5 million in awards.

“If we can reconceive of our government so that the interactions and the interplay between private sector, nonprofits, and government are opened up, and we use technology, data, social media in order to join forces around problems, then there’s no problem that we face in this country that is not soluble,” President Barack Obama said in the announcement.

About the Author

Matt Leonard is a reporter/producer at GCN.

Before joining GCN, Leonard worked as a local reporter for The Smithfield Times in southeastern Virginia. In his time there he wrote about town council meetings, local crime and what to do if a beaver dam floods your back yard. Over the last few years, he has spent time at The Commonwealth Times, The Denver Post and WTVR-CBS 6. He is a graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University, where he received the faculty award for print and online journalism.

Leonard can be contacted at mleonard@gcn.com or follow him on Twitter @Matt_Lnrd.

Click here for previous articles by Leonard.


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Tue, Sep 27, 2016

The good news is the taxpayers are only on the hook for 2/3 of this waste. The rest we will stick to our children and grandchildren. Read: it's called generational theft.

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