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Fully digitized credentialing for health professionals

The Indian Health Service is planning to centralize and upgrade the process by which it verifies and assesses the medical credentials of licensed independent practitioners.  And the agency wants to do so with a commercial solution.

Currently credentialing is handled independently by each of the nine area offices using different tools and varying business processes. Some offices have electronic application processes, while others are still using paper. IHS -- a component of the Department of Health and Human Services that is responsible for providing federal health services to American Indians and Alaska Natives -- has issued a solicitation for an agencywide, standardized, scalable commercial-off-the shelf solution that can support the collection, validation, secure storage and sharing of credentialing, privileging and background investigation information.

Some of the requirements include:

  • Encrypted interoperability with medical and government human resources verification databases.
  • Automated tracking of the status of applications and reminders of documentation expiration dates.
  • Ability to interface with data analytics and data visualization tools.
  • Role-based control of user access to databases, repositories, documents and correspondence.

IHS wants to have the new software operational in at least four pilot locations by July 2017; two locations must currently use credentialing software while the remaining locations must have paper-based processes.

Responses to the solicitation are due April 13.

About the Author

Matt Leonard is a reporter/producer at GCN.

Before joining GCN, Leonard worked as a local reporter for The Smithfield Times in southeastern Virginia. In his time there he wrote about town council meetings, local crime and what to do if a beaver dam floods your back yard. Over the last few years, he has spent time at The Commonwealth Times, The Denver Post and WTVR-CBS 6. He is a graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University, where he received the faculty award for print and online journalism.

Leonard can be contacted at mleonard@gcn.com or follow him on Twitter @Matt_Lnrd.

Click here for previous articles by Leonard.


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