HPE SGI 8600

New supercomputers headed to DOD

Department of Defense research labs has ordered  Hewlett Packard Enterprise supercomputers  “to accelerate the development and acquisition of advanced national security capabilities,” according to a company statement.

Four HPE SGI 8600 systems are going to the Air Force Research Laboratory's  DOD Supercomputing Resource Center at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base where they will be used to model current and advanced air, naval and ground weapon systems and platforms. Another  three will be installed at the Navy DSRC to support advanced weapons capabilities and provide high reliability for the Navy's global weather modeling requirements.

The HPE SGI 8600 is a sixth-generation computer running 24-core Intel Xeon scalable processors that offers petaflop speed and scalability to thousands of nodes. Bill Mannel, the vice president and general manager of HPC and AI at Hewlett Packard Enterprise, said these types of machines are becoming vital to the goals of agencies like the Defense Department.

“The DOD’s continuous investment in supercomputing innovation is a clear testament to this development and an important contribution to U.S. national security,” Mannel said in a statement.

These new HPE computers were purchased as part of the High Performance Computing Modernization Program, which uses high performance computing to advance DOD objectives.

At the Army Research Laboratory, SGI ICE XA supercomputers were used to improve vehicle armor to better protect against IEDs. With the machines researchers analyzed vehicle animations -- that rotating the images, moving them back and forward in time, manipulating them and testing improvements much faster than could be done through physical experiments. The research led to a new, more effective armor that took less than four months to get into the battlefield, where it enabled a 20 percent reduction in fatalities.

About the Author

Matt Leonard is a reporter/producer at GCN.

Before joining GCN, Leonard worked as a local reporter for The Smithfield Times in southeastern Virginia. In his time there he wrote about town council meetings, local crime and what to do if a beaver dam floods your back yard. Over the last few years, he has spent time at The Commonwealth Times, The Denver Post and WTVR-CBS 6. He is a graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University, where he received the faculty award for print and online journalism.

Leonard can be contacted at mleonard@gcn.com or follow him on Twitter @Matt_Lnrd.

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