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By GCN Staff

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Knox devices get NSA approval

Samsung Electronics announced its products have been placed on the Commercial Solutions for Classified (CSfC) Program Component List, making them the first consumer devices validated to handle classified information, the company said in its announcement.

The National Security Agency’s CSfC process allows commercial products to be used in layered  solutions to protect classi­fied information, giving agencies the ability to securely communicate based on commercial standards.

The approved products include the Galaxy S4, Galaxy S5, Galaxy Note 3, Galaxy Note 4, Galaxy Note 10.1 (2014 Edition), Galaxy Note Edge, Galaxy Alpha, Galaxy Tab S 8.4, Galaxy Tab S 10.5 and the Galaxy IPSEC Virtual Private Network (VPN). All devices and capabilities incorporate security features powered by Samsung Knox.

Samsung Knox is an enterprise security platform that enhances the security of data and applications on Android-based devices. It secures the boot process, provisioning, application execution, data storage and transmission, while retaining compatibility with the Android functionality and ecosystem. 

Earlier this year Samsung mobile devices were officially included on the Defense Information Systems Agency’s approved product list. The CSfC list for high security solutions supplements the DISA listing, enabling agencies and contractors to design solutions meeting the full range of government security objectives. Samsung is the only manufacturer with mobile devices on both lists, the company said.

Posted by GCN Staff on Oct 21, 2014 at 10:08 AM


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