GCN Tech Blog

By GCN Staff

Blog archive

DHS RFID dust-up: Take 2

The American Electronics Association sent over to GCN its reply to the Homeland Security Department's subcomittee draft, "The Use of RFID for Human Identification." The public comment period for that draft ended Monday. [Editor's note: To be clear, AeA met the deadline. They shared their comments with us later.]

As we mentioned in a previous posting, that draft report has raised some hackles. In it, the writers said DHS should "disfavor" RFID "for identifying and tracking human beings."

In our earlier posting, we shared the Smart Card Alliance's rather diplomatic response to the report. The AeA, which is among the biggest technology trade associations in the world, was a little more blunt.

In kicking things off, the response reads:

"AeA takes great exception over the approach the Draft Report takes in generalizing both the capabilities and uses of 'RFID technology,' as there are many sweeping, unsubstantiated and incorrect generalizations made without pointing to scientific data, field tests or published reports."

AeA's 11-page response is quite detailed and tackles many of the same issues that RFID proponents have been discussing for years, namely that technology doesn't track people, people track people, and that "technology choices should flow from a strong privacy and security policy."

In short, the response states, "The overall thrust of AeA's comments can be summed up succinctly: Don't ban technology, ban bad behavior."

Posted by Brad Grimes

Posted by Brad Grimes, Joab Jackson on May 24, 2006 at 9:39 AM


Featured

  • Comment
    Pilot Class. The author and Barbie Flowers are first row third and second from right, respectively.

    How VA is disrupting tech delivery

    A former Digital Service specialist at the Department of Veterans Affairs explains efforts to transition government from a legacy "project" approach to a more user-centered "product" method.

  • Cloud
    cloud migration

    DHS cloud push comes with complications

    A pressing data center closure schedule and an ensuing scramble to move applications means that some Homeland Security components might need more than one hop to get to the cloud.

  • Comment
    Blue Signage and logo of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

    Doing digital differently at VA

    The Department of Veterans Affairs CIO explains why digital transformation is not optional.

Stay Connected

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.