GCN Tech Blog

By GCN Staff

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DHS RFID dust-up: Take 2

The American Electronics Association sent over to GCN its reply to the Homeland Security Department's subcomittee draft, "The Use of RFID for Human Identification." The public comment period for that draft ended Monday. [Editor's note: To be clear, AeA met the deadline. They shared their comments with us later.]

As we mentioned in a previous posting, that draft report has raised some hackles. In it, the writers said DHS should "disfavor" RFID "for identifying and tracking human beings."

In our earlier posting, we shared the Smart Card Alliance's rather diplomatic response to the report. The AeA, which is among the biggest technology trade associations in the world, was a little more blunt.

In kicking things off, the response reads:

"AeA takes great exception over the approach the Draft Report takes in generalizing both the capabilities and uses of 'RFID technology,' as there are many sweeping, unsubstantiated and incorrect generalizations made without pointing to scientific data, field tests or published reports."

AeA's 11-page response is quite detailed and tackles many of the same issues that RFID proponents have been discussing for years, namely that technology doesn't track people, people track people, and that "technology choices should flow from a strong privacy and security policy."

In short, the response states, "The overall thrust of AeA's comments can be summed up succinctly: Don't ban technology, ban bad behavior."

Posted by Brad Grimes

Posted by Brad Grimes, Joab Jackson on May 24, 2006 at 9:39 AM


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