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By GCN Staff

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CompTIA overhauls A+ certs

The Computing Technology Industry Association is overhauling its venerable A+ certification program. Traditionally, studying for these exams has given budding computer technicians a primer in the basics, and an A+ cert can make a nice accouterment on a system administrator's resume. So the news of the change is somewhat exciting.

These days, CompTIA A+ certification is awarded upon successfully passing two written exams. One test is for computer hardware (power supplies, motherboards n' such) and the other tests fluency in configuring operating systems (with a heavy emphasis on the many'and sometimes minute'variations of Microsoft Windows).

Now CompTIA will fuse these two courses of study under one exam, called the 'A+ Essentials." CompTIA will also require cert-seekers to pass to take a second 'elective' exam, which can be any one of a number of specialized areas such as remote support or call center support. According to the announcement, CompTIA wants to tailor at least part of its tests for specific industries.CompTIA plans to offer the new exams this fall. And for those who'd rather test under the old order, you'd better get cracking! CompTIA will offer those legacy tests until the end of the year.

'Posted By Joab Jackson

Posted by Brad Grimes, Joab Jackson on Jun 09, 2006 at 9:39 AM


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