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By GCN Staff

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The good and bad of the Semantic Web

The Semantic Web seems to be generating some buzz of late. The knighted father of the World Wide Web, Sir Tim Berners-Lee has tirelessly advocated the Semantic Web as the next logical step in the online world, though whether it can work on a global scale remains an open question.

Dan Zambonini at O'Reilly XML site argues in ' Why the World is ready for the Semantic Web ' that many of the technologies growing in popularity today could benefit from RDF, OWL and all those other acronymically-cryptic Semantic Web technologies. Semantic data could enrich RSS feeds, tag collections of photos, generate personal profiles and help users make mash-ups, or composite applications, he noted.

Less optimistic about Berners-Lee's vision is Peter Norvig, Google's director of search. According to ZD Net Australia, Norvig faced off with Berners-Lee at an artificial intelligence conference. Sure, the Semantic Web is good in theory, he seemed to be saying, but from Google's view, Webmasters are still struggling too much with basic tasks such as keeping their server software running and writing proper HTML to worry about adding machine-parseable semantic context to their content.

--Posted by Joab Jackson

Posted by Brad Grimes, Joab Jackson on Jul 21, 2006 at 9:39 AM


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