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By GCN Staff

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Eclipse vs. NetBeans

The latest edition of the Java Posse podcast concentrates on the world of integrated developer environments. It seems as of a few years ago there were almost a dozen Java IDEs to choose from, but thanks to the raging popularity of the open source Eclipse, the ranks have thinned to the point where developers have two serious choices: Eclipse or NetBeans (though Oracle Corp.'s JDeveloper holds on for Oracle shops.). The users share of Borland Software Corp's JBuilder, once the overwhelming tool-of-choice for Java coders, seems to have been completely decimated by Eclipse. Now that software only exists as a plug-in for Eclipse. The true battle these days is happening between the plug-ins, not the IDEs.

The Posse's team of Java experts, from Google Inc., Sun Microsystems Inc. and elsewhere, also discussed the split between those who use IDEs and those coders who still operate from the command line (The preference seemed to be split evenly about 50/50 of those within in attendance of this live broadcast). And of course, among the hard-core command-line coders, the split between Vi and Emacs remain as divisive as ever. --Posted by Joab Jackson

Posted by Joab Jackson on Apr 18, 2007 at 9:39 AM


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