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By GCN Staff

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From WWW to GGG

The father of the Web, Sir Tim Berners-Lee, recently posted a blog entry suggesting we start thinking about this information space we all use daily not as the World Wide Web, but rather as the Giant Global Graph, GGG for short.

The move would signify our shift in thinking. Think about how you refer to how you find information online. We used to talk about finding information on the Internet, More recently, we talk about finding information on the Web. But really, that's still clunky.

"The Net links computers, the Web links documents," Berners-Lee writes. "Now, people are making another mental move. There is realization now, 'It's not the documents, it is the things they are about which are important.'"

In other words, with the Web, we think of Web sites, but we really need to move towards thinking about the specific information we are trying to retrieve from the Web.

We were tipped off by this blog posting by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute computer and cognitive science professor Dr. James Hendler, who we interviewed about the future of computing for our upcoming 25th Anniversary issue of GCN.

Hendler noted that as we seek more and more on-the-spot information with our mobile devices, we will increasingly need a far more nuanced way of retrieving that information.

For instance, if we just need an address, we don't need an entire Web page, or database, that contains that address. We just need the address itself.

"How do I find what I need in a way that is useful for me at that time?" he summed up the challenge.

Thinking about information in terms of a giant GGG may help in that regard.

Posted by Joab Jackson on Nov 29, 2007 at 9:39 AM


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