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By GCN Staff

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Happy Computer Security Day!

Today, Nov. 30, is Computer Security Day.

Many people assume it is only another holiday invented by the greeting card companies to sell cards or just an excuse for another day off work for government employees. But no; it is an actual upper-case Day, created by the Association for Computer Security Day and celebrated each year since 1988 on the last day of November (or the first business day following, if that day falls on a weekend).

This year it falls on a Friday, of course. But Computer Security Day is about more than just a three-day weekend. The folks at Symantec Corp. have offered a few tips for helping to keep your computers secure year-round:

' Create a Security Aware Culture: A one-time presentation or a static set of activities is not sufficient to address the ever-evolving threats to the security landscape. To be effective, organizations should have an ongoing security awareness program of continuous training

' Establish Processes: The root cause of IT failure frequently lies in problems with process and skills. Regular or routine activities should have established processes, reducing effort and risk entailed when each component is managed differently.

' Have a Remediation Strategy in Place: Classify and protect intellectual property, implement secure applications and infrastructures based on these classifications, establish appropriate backup procedures, and map internal IT safeguards and business policy requirements to compliance standards such as FISMA, HIPAA, Sarbanes-Oxley, COBIT, and other industry accepted standards.

Have a sane and happy Computer Security Day.

Posted by William Jackson on Nov 30, 2007 at 9:39 AM


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