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By GCN Staff

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On the hunt for great public-sector websites

Know of any great public-sector websites? We want to hear about them — sites that have efficient, effective and innovative ways of delivering information, interacting with people and serving the public. We’ll feature the best of them online and in our first issue of the new year.

The push for open government and public engagement has intensified the spotlight on the Web. This has no doubt affected the way federal agencies communicate with one another and interact with the public.


Related stories:

10 gov Web sites that get results

Great dot-gov Web sites 2009

Great dot-gov Web sites 2008


During the past two years, GCN has focused on highlighting 10 great government Web sites. The rise of social networking in 2009 prompted the smarter agencies to establish a presence on Twitter, Facebook and other sites. The previous year — GCN’s first list of 10 great government websites — reflected the realization that the Web can be the primary form of interaction with constituents.

For this year's list, we focused on 10 great Web applications and the innovative ideas and approaches that gave birth to them. Many of the applications attested to the push toward more open government and transparency.

Now as we look toward a new year, GCN is looking to highlight innovative public sector websites across federal, state and local governments. If you know of any site or would like to submit suggestions, feel free to put your suggestions in the comments box below.

Posted by Rutrell Yasin on Nov 19, 2010 at 9:39 AM


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