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iPhone 5 slims down, speeds up

A lot of speculation had been in the air prior to last week’s announcement by Apple for its new iPhone 5. Now that we’ve had a chance to examine the specs, several concrete improvements over its predecessor have made themselves apparent.

That is pretty impressive, considering that it’s been under two years since the iPhone 4 came out, and just less than a year since the appearance of the Siri-powered iPhone 4S. And also surprising considering the relatively small number of improvements the new iPad had.

First, the display. Of course the new iPhone will have a smart phone-sized version of Apple's new Retina display. But what is truly impressive is that Apple managed to increase the size of the display from 3.5 inches to 4 inches without changing the size of the casing, except to make the phone slimmer.

This will allow just a bit more text to show, and the keys on the keyboard will be just a little bit bigger. It’s a small increase, but for some new users it may mean the difference between an unbearable experience and a workable one.

The new phone also has the new iOS 6 operating system, which has a number of new features, including what Apple says is an improved Siri that can handle a broader range of requests. And it’s the first iPhone to support 4G Long Term Evolution technology.

Dual 802.11n wireless radios and the new A6 chip should mean faster performance that will be noticeable. Apple says the A6 has twice the processing and graphics performance of the A5 chips in the iPhone 4S.

Apple even redesigned the earbuds to deliver sound better, though audiophiles would say that it might not make a difference as long as you are listening to compressed music.

There are a bunch of other, more minor changes in the iPhone 5, but these are the ones you are likely to notice first. We will keep you posted as we find out more. Meanwhile, if you want to join the already record number of preorders, feel free.

Posted by Greg Crowe on Sep 18, 2012 at 9:39 AM


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