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Are smart phones ready to dump voice plans for VOIP?

Voice over IP services are becoming increasingly prevalent in agencies, replacing many old landline systems. And VOIP in the office also holds appeal for mobile users. The ability to talk to someone using your computer’s Internet connection is often more desirable than using up voice plan minutes on your cell phone.

For that matter, with the availability of Skype, social media and online messaging sites, and even Facebook adding VOIP to its mobile app, you might be also to just ditch that voice plan forever, right?

Jessica Leber, business editor at MIT Technology Review, found out it’s not that simple. She tried to spend a week during the December holidays without using any voice or SMS texting from her Android phone. Although she gave it a good try, she did not last the entire week, mostly due to complications in connecting VOIP programs via her smart phone to other people’s phone numbers, and the not-quite-there sound quality in most of the VOIP services she tried.
 
I think one of the major things that will keep folks from switching from their tried-and-true voice plans is that most of the people they’re calling also haven’t switched yet. Agencies switching office systems to VOIP with solid broadband connections is one thing; going mobile with VOIP is another.

Since live communication by definition requires two or more people, all parties really need to be on VOIP for it to work optimally. That won’t happen until nearly everyone decides at the same time to start using VOIP. Okay, ready everyone? On the count of three…

Yeah, we are going to have traditional voice plans for a while.

Posted by Greg Crowe on Jan 31, 2013 at 9:39 AM


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