Mobile

Blog archive
Laptop keyboard with a feedback button

Mobile Gov crowdsources app feedback

Trying to develop mobile apps or websites for your agency is not easy, but it’s only half the game. It’s even harder sometimes to determine what users are getting out of the experience, or even how they will interact with your carefully crafted code.

Mobile Gov, made up of the folks at the General Services Administration who, with the help of experts in the government and private enterprise, are developing the Mobile Gov Wiki, has launched a crowdsourcing project to help agencies measure how well their apps and sites resonate with users.

The group started collecting data late last year with a survey base made up of the State and Labor departments, the National Library of Medicine and 15 other agencies. The idea was “to collect and develop mobile user experience guidelines/recommendations for agencies to use when developing and updating mobile products (apps, mobile web, SMS, etc.),” according to the Mobile Gov blog.

However, to cast a wider net, the group is crowdsourcing a mobile user experience survey, asking participants to rate the elements on a series of pages. The survey consists of questions covering issues such as  information architecture, language, content structure, trust/privacy, design and functionality. It shouldn’t take more than five or 10 minutes to complete. And the results could help agencies nail down metrics they need to keep improving their services. Take the survey and help government improve its mobile presentations.

Posted by Greg Crowe on Mar 11, 2013 at 9:39 AM


Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.