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NCI QuitPal stop smoking mobile app

NCI's QuitPal app improves health, one smoker at a time

Despite government mandates and corporate policies, many employees still smoke cigarettes. This epidemic can be looked at to cost both employees and the agencies they work for countless dollars in medical insurance and maintenance costs, not to mention the payout for the actual cigarettes, which quite frankly is getting expensive.

The 2010 Surgeon General’s report said that “low levels of smoke exposure, including exposures to secondhand tobacco smoke, lead to a rapid and sharp increase in dysfunction and inflammation of the lining of the blood vessels, which are implicated in heart attacks and stroke.” So the smokers are not the only ones at risk.

Many smokers want to quit, but they don’t know where to start. The National Cancer Institute wants to help. NCI has released a free smart-phone app called NCI QuitPal that will help someone become smoke-free.

With it you can set a quit date, financial goals and reminders to help you stay on track. It will track money saved on not buying cigarettes, keep track of packs not smoked, supply tips to help deal with cravings and give you milestones pertaining to your estimated state of health based upon how long you’ve been smoke-free. It even has a hotline to NCI’s Cancer Information Service if you have any questions.

NCI QuitPal does pretty much everything for you except the most important thing – actually quitting smoking. Only you can do that. But this app will make it easier to keep track of your progress, which might be all the incentive a smoker looking to quit needs.



Posted by Greg Crowe on Mar 26, 2013 at 9:39 AM


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