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Some Samsung, Dell printers vulnerable to remote attackers

Some Samsung and Dell printers made by Samsung have a firmware flaw that could allow unauthenticated users access to sensitive information on the devices, according to a notice  released this week by the U.S. Computer Emergency Response Team.

US-CERT said the popular government printers contain a hardcoded Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) full read-write string that could give an unauthenticated user access to information on the device, “even when the protocol is disabled in the printer management utility." The SNMP is used to monitor the status of remote devices.

An attacker with administrative read/write privileges could therefore access information, make changes to the device configuration and even have, “the ability to leverage further attacks through arbitrary code execution,” according to US-CERT.

Samsung and Dell said models released after Oct. 31, 2012 are not affected by the vulnerability. Samsung added that it is “committed to releasing updated firmware for all current models by Nov. 30, with all other models receiving an update by the end of the year.”

In the meantime, CERT said blocking the custom SNMP trap port of 1118/udp could help lower the risks posed by the backdoor. It also recommended network administrators to allow connections only from trusted hosts and networks.

“Restricting access would prevent an attacker from accessing an SNMP interface using the affected credentials from a blocked network location,” it said.

Posted by Paul McCloskey on Nov 29, 2012 at 9:39 AM


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