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By GCN Staff

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M1A1 Abrams Main Battle Tank

Army wants software libraries for combat-vehicle training

The Army is on the look-out for software tools that could help train soldiers to operate a number of its most powerful combat vehicles, including the Abrams and Bradley tanks and its Wolverine and Stryker armored vehicles.

In a “market investigation survey”  issued this month, the Army said it wanted developers to build training software libraries that could replicate the behavior of the vehicles in the real world as well as provide common training capabilities across all vehicle-specific training systems.

The Army wants to two classes of software: a common software library (CSL), which replicates the operations of a specific vehicle, and a common embedded training system (CETS), a library of various training components such as instructor operations, scoring and after-action reviews.

CET systems would aim to augment rather than replace existing stand-alone training systems or capabilities and provide the ability “to train anywhere at any time, at home station or while deployed,” the Army notice said.

Before the use of common software libraries, training systems replicated the operations of a single vehicle. But keeping current with the vehicles’ software updates was hard to maintain and replicating the precise behavior was nearly impossible, according to the Army.

Instead, the Army prefers working with a single developer that has both a thorough grounding of the combat vehicles and training systems that tap the software libraries. The plan is for a common approach across all training systems and “assures that the warfighters are training on systems that reflect current fielded vehicle systems behavior,” according to the notice.

Posted by Paul McCloskey on Jan 16, 2013 at 9:39 AM


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