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By GCN Staff

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Conference attendees register at hotel

GSA goes online to teach feds how to travel

Stung by employee excesses at a Las Vegas conference last year, the General Services Administration is taking steps through online education to prevent a recurrence by its workers and those of other agencies as well.

GSA has announced a series of travel training courses with the assistance of D.C.-based Blackboard aimed at teaching federal workers how to behave while on travel status, reported Government Executive.

The agency is using the “big mistake we had in the last year,” when conference attendees ran up a government bill of more than $800,000, to help all federal workers learn behavior standards away from the office, Lauren Concklin, a GSA marketing analyst, was quoted as saying.

The goal of the virtual training is to reduce travel excesses – such as the activities by Secret Service agents in a Cartegena, Colombia, hotel last spring – and help agencies realize efficiencies and savings.

Among the courses GSA is offering is a basic primer on travel regulations that covers such topics as transportation, per diem and miscellaneous expense allowances. Another course will provide instruction in how to plan, coordinate and execute conferences in accordance with, among others, the Federal Travel Regulation, Executive Directives and the Government Accountability Office.

The GSA program will include a new tracking feature so that completed courses automatically will be updated into an employee’s personal file, Concklin said.

The first course was scheduled to begin in January with others to follow in February.

Posted by David Hubler on Jan 30, 2013 at 9:39 AM


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