Pulse

By GCN Staff

Blog archive
Man running with mobile phone

IPv6 boosts mobile performance, panel claims

As the use of IPv6 broadens, mobile users should see gains in performance, according to members of a panel at the recent Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

According to a ComputerWorld article on the discussion, panel members said that one source of improved performance would be that each IPv6-connected device — be it smart phone, phone, router, security camera or office peripheral  —  can communicate directly to each other over the Internet. 

Service providers using IPv4, by contrast, use a process called Network Address Translation that "assigns true, unique Internet addresses to subscribers' devices only temporarily," ComputerWorld reported. The administrative overhead of sending packets back and forth to keep the connection alive slows performance and consumes power.

In addition, IPv6's massive pool of addresses allow an IP address to stay with the mobile device, eliminating the administrative traffic and dropped service when a user travels from one cell to another.

Although the Office of Management and Budget mandated that agencies enable the new protocols on public-facing services such as websites by Sept. 30, 2012, adoption has been slow.

Posted by Susan Miller on Jan 14, 2013 at 9:39 AM


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