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Postal Service worker sorting mail by hand

Postal Service seeks ideas on a 'dynamic routing system'

The U.S. Postal Service is ready to try just about anything to reduce its massive deficit, stay competitive with private delivery services and still deliver the mail – although not on Saturdays in future.

Now it’s turning to the public for technology ideas on how to build a “dynamic routing” system that will better speed deliveries, according to the Reuters news agency.

In January the service posted a solicitation on FedBizOpps calling on companies and individuals to create such a routing system that would “offer a more innovative approach to deliver mail given the potential changes in the present rigid delivery structure, without inordinate complexity or lengthy implementation requirements.”

Mail volume has dropped by about 25 percent over the last decade as more Americans use email, the news agency said. A new advanced routing system based on the latest technologies, including GPS, would allow the Postal Service to introduce new products, find better routes for delivery and in the process increase revenue.

"There's an upside and a downside to the Internet," USPS spokeswoman Sue Brennan told Reuters. "It has decreased our first class mail, but what it's done is that people are shopping online and they need someone to deliver these packages."

She said the Postal Service wants a system that will expedite package delivery beyond regular carrier routing that makes the best use of postal resources, its employees, time and fuel, among others.

Posted by David Hubler on Feb 13, 2013 at 9:39 AM


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