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By GCN Staff

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PIV card with biometric background

GSA wants ideas on next-gen ID management

The General Services Administration is looking for ideas and comments for identification management in 2014 and beyond. In an attempt to assess the validity and viability of its requirements, GSA’s request for information seeks technologies that can offer greater operational functionality, more efficiency and expanded customer support in areas including system architecture, security, billing, reporting and service-level agreements.

GSA currently delivers nationwide end-to-end Personal Identity Verification (PIV) services to approximately 95 federal departments, agencies, boards and commissions, which support 850,000 identity accounts. GSA’s Managed Services Office provides identity management services such as enrollment, PIV Card activation and backend systems infrastructure and integration for any agency that wishes to save money by leveraging GSA’s larger capital investment.

Specifically, GSA’s RFI asked companies to submit responses that address high-level requirements, including:

  • Mobile/portable solutions for all issuance/post-issuance capability.
  • Collection of multi-modal biometric types (iris, facial, fingerprints, etc.).
  • Secure cloud services and virtualization solutions, etc.
  • Transitioning existing hardware.
  • Temporary credentials for forgotten, damaged or stolen cards.

At this time no solicitation exists, so companies are not to submit proposals.

Posted by Susan Miller on Jun 14, 2013 at 9:39 AM


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