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By GCN Staff

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New E-Verify security enhancement helps deter employee fraud

An enhancement to the Homeland Security Department's E-Verify program will help identify and deter fraudulent use of Social Security numbers (SSNs) for employment eligibility verification.

Using a combination of algorithms, detection reports and analysis, Citizenship and Immigration Services will identify patterns indicating fraudulent use of SSNs and then lock and flag those numbers in the E-Verify system.

E-Verify is a free Web-based service offered by the Department of Homeland Security that allows employers to quickly verify the employment eligibility of new employees. In fiscal 2013, E-Verify was used to authorize workers in the U.S. more than 25 million times, representing a nearly 20 percent increase from fiscal 2012.

The new enhancement strengthens E-Verify by using standards that have proven effective in protecting individual identity. Just like a credit card company will lock a card that appears to have been stolen, CIS may now lock SSNs in E-Verify that appear to have been used fraudulently, the agency said in a statement.

If an employee attempts to use a locked SSN, E-Verify will generate a “Tentative Nonconfirmation” (TNC). The employee receiving the TNC will have the opportunity to contest the finding at a local Social Security Administration field office. If an SSA field officer confirms the employee’s identity correctly matches the SSN, the TNC will be converted to “Employment Authorized” status in E-Verify.

Posted by GCN Staff on Dec 06, 2013 at 8:16 AM


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