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By GCN Staff

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Facial recognition tech takes on DUI offenders

The crackdown on drunk driving could be moving to the next level with a new alcohol testing system that combines traditional breathalyzers with government-grade facial recognition software.  

The handheld, wireless, portable breath alcohol device incorporates automated facial recognition and GPS with every single test. The technology is being used for long-term, unsupervised alcohol testing of first-time and low-level drunk drivers, according to the announcement by Denver-based Alcohol Monitoring Systems.

A SCRAM Remote Breath uses facial recognition software the company calls Automated Facial Intelligence to digitally map the facial features of the offenders as they take the test to match and compare those features to baseline images stored within the system, ensuring that the person taking the breath test is the offender required to submit to testing.

The technology automatically identifies 90 to 95 percent of the photos captured each day, while the remaining five to 10 percent are flagged by law enforcement for manual review, according to the SCRAM Systems website.

Alcohol Monitoring Systems developed  the SCRAM Continuous Alcohol Monitoring unsupervised test in 2003. The transdermal alcohol testing system involves an ankle bracelet that samples an offender’s sweat every half hour, 24/7 to measure for alcohol consumption.

 It is mainly used for high-risk alcohol offenders however, and SCRAM Remote Breath could provide courts with a less-intensive option for lower level offenders. Alcohol Monitoring Systems believes the new test will increase the number of courts utilizing technology to manage their alcohol offenders. Offenders may move up to Continuous Alcohol Monitoring if they fail a Remote Breath test, or move down to Remote Breath if they demonstrate a prolonged period of sobriety.

Posted by Mike Cipriano on Feb 26, 2014 at 10:26 AM


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