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By GCN Staff

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Internet2's 100G network speeds genomics research

Scientists running genomic analyses at George Washington University’s Colonial One High Performance Computing Center will pilot ultra-high-speed 40 gigabit/sec data transfers of their research from the National Institutes of Health’s National Library of Medicine using new 100 gigabit/sec links to the Internet2 network.

“High-speed transfers via Internet2’s network will enable us to provide our genomic clients with faster results, ultimately hastening discovery and therapeutic decisions," Raja Mazumder, associate professor of biochemistry and molecular medicine at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, said in an announcement

Mazumder is also co-developer of the High-performance Integrated Virtual Environment (HIVE), a genomic analysis platform that speeds up the analysis of genomic data. 

“Internet2 is pleased to be part of this public-private collaboration. Our 100 gigabit network enables a high-performance genomics platform like HIVE to realize its full potential by removing external bottlenecks,” said Michael Sullivan, associate director, Internet2.

George Washington University connects to the Internet2 backbone through its new research network, the Capital Area Advanced Research and Education Network. CAAREN provides high-performance research and education infrastructure to government, education and research organizations, as well as some private-sector organizations, in the Washington, D.C. area. It aims to facilitate world-class research, education and knowledge sharing in the nation’s capital.

CAAREN is also partnering with DC-Net, a program managed by the D.C. Office of the Chief Technology Officer, to provide public and private K-12 schools, public libraries, museums, hospitals and independent research organizations with access to Internet2.

Posted by GCN Staff on Mar 03, 2014 at 12:18 PM


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