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By GCN Staff

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USGS to merge National Atlas and National Map programs

The National Atlas of the United States and the National Map will be combined into a single source for geospatial and cartographic information,  the U.S. Geological Survey announced.

The purpose of the merger is to streamline access to information from the USGS National Geospatial Program, which will help set priorities for its civilian mapping role and “consolidate core investments,” the USGS said.

The National Atlas provides a map-like view of the geospatial and geostatistical collected for the United States. It was designed to “enhance and extend our geographic knowledge and understanding and to foster national self-awareness,” according to its website. It will be removed from service on Sept. 30, 2014, as part of the conversion.  Some of the products and services from the National Atlas will continue to be available from The National Map, while others will not, the agency said.  A National Atlas transition page is online and will be updated with the latest news on the continuation or disposition of National Atlas products and services.

The National Map is designed to improve and deliver topographic information for the United States. It has been used for scientific analysis and emergency response, according to the USGS website.

In an effort to make the transition an easy one, the agency said it would post updates to the National Map and National Atlas websites during the conversion, including the “availability of the products and services currently delivered by nationalatlas.gov.”

“We recognize how important it is for citizens to have access to the cartographic and geographic information of our nation, said National Geospatial Program Director Mark DeMulder. “We are committed to providing that access through nationalmap.gov.”

Posted by Mike Cipriano on Mar 14, 2014 at 8:56 AM


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