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By GCN Staff

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API layer fuels official US Navy mobile app

Thanks to a strong application programming interface layer, the U.S. Navy has been able to effectively launch a mobile app to connect sailors and their families with relevant and updated content.

The app, built by Web developer Mobomo, brings together content from around the fleet and makes it available in a single, constantly updating app. Users can view photos of its ships and submarines and watch videos of drones being launched. It provides users with all the relevant information they need whenever they need it.

“It’s about being where it matters, when it matters,” said Mobomo COO Brian Lacey at the recent MobdevGov conference in Rosslyn, Va.

Users can create a customizable experience by selecting themes, video playlists and image galleries relative to their deployment, career and interests. Sailors and their families can stay up to date with news alerts and calendar tools.  

The mobile app also features an interactive map, which shows the locations of all bases, events and deployed forces.

Lacey said the importance of an API layer is often overlooked, and that the app would not have worked without it. The function of the API layer in this case is to pull in the multimedia content and push it out to different devices. It is essentially operating as an adaptor plug to make the app functional on a number of platforms.

The API has made the app available for the iPhone, iPad, Android phones, Android tablets, Windows 8 tablets and Chromebooks. By connecting to the different platforms, the API lets users instantly configure the app, creating push notifications as well as adding and deleting feeds, video content and breaking news alerts.

The API layer also provides the app’s security, preventing hackers from accessing  its source code.

Posted by Mike Cipriano on Mar 03, 2014 at 10:57 AM


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