Pulse

By GCN Staff

Blog archive

Los Alamos unleashes HPC for unclassified research

Los Alamos National Laboratory recently announced it had installed a new high-performance computer system, called Wolf, which will be used for unclassified research.

Wolf, manufactured by Cray Inc., has 616 compute nodes – each with two 8-core 2.6 GHz Intel Sandybridge processors, 64 GB of memory and a high speed Infiniband interconnect network. It uses the Lab’s existing Panasas parallel file system as well as a new one based on Lustre technology and will run at 197 teraflops per second.

“This machine modernizes our mid-tier resources available to Laboratory scientists,” said Bob Tomlinson, of the Laboratory’s High Performance Computing group. “Wolf is a critical tool that can be used to advance many fields of science.”

Initial science research projects to use Wolf include climate, materials and astrophysics modeling.

The Lab’s Institutional Computing program provides production-computing resources for open and collaborative science at the laboratory through a competitive, peer-reviewed proposal process. Los Alamos scientists use these systems for fundamental as well as applied research in a wide variety of technical fields.

Posted by GCN Staff on Jun 19, 2014 at 11:15 AM


Featured

  • FCW Perspectives
    tech process (pkproject/Shutterstock.com)

    Understanding the obstacles to automation

    As RPA moves from buzzword to practical applications, agency leaders say it’s forcing broader discussions about business operations

  • Federal 100 Awards
    Federal 100 logo

    Fed 100 nominations are now open

    Help us identify this year's outstanding individuals in federal IT.

Stay Connected

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.