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By GCN Staff

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State seeks info on asset discovery tools

The State Department is looking for vendors who can provide asset discovery tools to track IT equipment and installed software at the agency’s domestic and overseas locations, according to a presolicitation notice on FedBizOpps.

The asset discovery tools will help the department better understand its computer environment and will be used to reduce unnecessary license fees and maintenance costs. Among the desired capabilities are:

  • A summary of all computer hardware and software found on the network.
  • A summary of the readiness of computers on the network for migration and which computers already meet the hardware requirements.
  • Automatic identification of distributed software activity to help manage increasingly complex license compliance.
  • A summary of infrequently used software to help reduce unnecessary license fees and maintenance costs.
  • A summary of hardware currently in use and what software is installed on it.
  • Software usage metering.

The State Department said it intends the RFI be a living, on-going process until the information obtained meets its needs. At that point, a formal request for quotation will be initiated.  

Posted by GCN Staff on Jul 01, 2014 at 7:48 AM


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