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Mozilla releases Firefox browser built for developers

Mozilla releases Firefox browser built for developers

Mozilla released what it calls the first browser for developers.

 Firefox Developer Edition includes tools for building, testing and scaling all from one place, eliminating the need to, “bounce between different platforms and browsers, which decreases productivity and causes frustration,” according to the announcement by Dave Camp, director of developer tools at Mozilla.

Among features built into the browser are:

A distinct theme that includes quicker access to the developer tools.

Experimental developer tools, including the Valence add-on, used to  connect the Firefox developer tools to other browsers such as Chrome on Android and Safari on iOS.

A separate profile. Run the Developer Edition alongside a different release or Beta version of Firefox.

WebIDE, Develop, deploy and debug Firefox OS apps directly in the browser or on a Firefox OS device.

Responsive design view: See how a website or web app will look on different screen sizes without changing the size of the browser window.

In addition, Firefox Developer Edition replaces the Aurora channel in the Firefox Release Process. Like Aurora, features will land in the Developer Edition every six weeks, after they have stabilized in Nightly builds.

By using the Developer Edition, devs can gain access to tools and platform features at least 12 weeks before they reach the main Firefox release channel.

Posted by GCN Staff on Nov 18, 2014 at 10:48 AM


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