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By GCN Staff

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Mobile apps promise time savings for citizens, caseworkers

Mobile apps promise time savings for citizens, caseworkers

While agencies build out their mobile services delivery, a recent survey suggests citizens are ready to use their smartphones to connect with government. 

Nearly half (46 percent) of the recipients of assistance from human services agencies surveyed by Accenture say they would likely download and use a mobile application for obtaining services. That number jumped to 64 percent when survey respondents were asked if they would be interested in mobile access to such day-to-day activities as checking their benefits, applying for assistance or submitting questions to caseworkers.

According to the survey, the most common means of citizen interaction with social services agencies currently is via telephone (32 percent), followed by in-person office visits (23 percent).  Only 9 percent of respondents, on average, say they now make use of websites for dealing with their human services-related activities. 

Human services apps can deliver significant benefits to citizens by eliminating visits to the human services office. Because apps lower call volume and in-person visits and automate basic services, caseworkers can work more efficiently. In fact, Accenture estimates that the broad use of mobile apps among citizens could save caseworkers and their agencies 62 days worth of time per year.

“The benefits of convenience and time savings associated with mobile applications address the biggest pain points people associate with visiting human services offices,” said Debora Morris, managing director, for Accenture Integrated Social Services. “Mobile applications also can provide potential benefits to agencies to reduce costs to serve citizens while freeing up caseworkers for higher value-added activities. We estimate that an average-sized U.S. state human services agency could save around $14 million annually by deploying mobile apps for citizens.”

Posted by GCN Staff on Jan 05, 2015 at 9:04 AM


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