Pulse

By GCN Staff

Blog archive
NIST funds center to model disaster recovery strategies

NIST funds center to model disaster recovery strategies

After a large storm system rips through a community, a quick response time is essential for saving lives and rebuilding so communities can get back to business.  To help communities improve disaster response and remediation, The National Institute of Standards and Technology awarded a $20 million contract to Colorado State University to create the Community Resilience Center of Excellence.

The center will develop computer tools and virtual models to help local governments decide how best to invest in resources to mitigate the impact of extreme weather on communities and speed recovery. 

NIST-CORE or Community Resilience Modeling Environment, will be a pivotal piece of the center’s capabilities for meeting stated goals.  Using an open-source platform, NIST-CORE will incorporate risk-based decision-making and enable quantitative comparisons of different resilience strategies, NIST said.

The system will provide scientific metrics and decision tools that communities will use to evaluate the resilience of a built environment and its interconnected infrastructure. The models will also integrate social systems that are essential to recovering communities in various sectors, such as health care delivery, education, social services and financial institutions.

“The tools developed by the center will help to further advance the important goal of disaster resilience from ambitious concepts to cost-effective solutions that communities can implement over time,” said Acting Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards and Technology and Acting NIST Director Willie May.

NIST-CORE will eventually be capable of performing analysis unlike any other disaster-resilience model in the world – learning from one analysis to the next.  As it continues to be applied, NIST-CORE’s performance will be tested alongside data from previous disasters. 

Posted by Mark Pomerleau on Mar 04, 2015 at 1:50 PM


Featured

  • FCW Perspectives
    human machine interface

    Your agency isn’t ready for AI

    To truly take advantage, government must retool both its data and its infrastructure.

  • Cybersecurity
    secure network (bluebay/Shutterstock.com)

    Federal CISO floats potential for new supply chain regs

    The federal government's top IT security chief and canvassed industry for feedback on how to shape new rules of the road for federal acquisition and procurement.

  • People
    DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, shown here at her Nov. 8, 2017, confirmation hearing. DHS Photo by Jetta Disco

    DHS chief Nielsen resigns

    Kirstjen Nielsen, the first Homeland Security secretary with a background in cybersecurity, is being replaced on an acting basis by the Customs and Border Protection chief. Her last day is April 10.

Stay Connected

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.