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Army eyes virtual training

Army eyes cloud-based virtual training

The Army is making plans for a cloud-based fully immersive training environment that aims to make soldiers’ time in the field more productive and meaningful.

"The next capability will be a leader-focused, soldier-centric capability that immerses a soldier, wherever they are at the point of training, in a synthetic environment, that allows us to tailor that environment to the demands of the leader," Col. David S. Cannon of the Combined Arms Center said. Officials expect those next-gen tools to be introduced between 2023 and 2031, Defense Systems reported.

Cannon envisions the use of 3D goggles that that will realistically and cost-effectively replicate real-life scenarios, such as assembling and disassembling weapons systems for soldiers, no matter their location.  The virtual training will be a “cloud-based, network-delivered, device-oriented capability that is borne on the mission command information network," he said.

The military as a whole has embraced virtual training tools as a means of more efficient training. The Army’s Future Holistic Training Environment-Live Synthetic, or “Live Synth” encompasses several realistic battlespace scenarios and computer modeled simulations that include training with small arms, armored vehicle and aircraft. The Office of Navy Research’s video game-based training tool Strike Group Defender allows sailors to train in a risk-free environment, offering feedback on performance in deploying electronic mechanisms to either avoid incoming missiles or offensively shoot them down.

Posted by Mark Pomerleau on Apr 15, 2015 at 8:27 AM


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