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Charlotte updates Citygram with more open data

Charlotte updates Citygram with more open data

Citizens of Charlotte, N.C., can now get notices when rezoning plans are submitted for review, thanks to an upgrade to Citygram, a web app that notifies subscribers of non-emergency events. The added functionality is part of Charlotte’s ongoing efforts to increase government transparency and better connect citizens to city hall. According to the city, more than 200 subscribers have already received 65,000 notifications.

Originally developed in 2014 by a Code for America team working in Charlotte, Citygram leverages operational data from the city's Open Data Portal, a one-stop shop for information on transportation, community safety, neighborhoods and housing. Residents subscribe to topics on Citygram, and information is sent directly to them via text or email.

The service has expanded beyond Charlotte, and covers Seattle, New York, San Francisco and Lexington, Ky., as well.

As a city grows its library of datasets, Citygram can be updated to include them. According to Charlotte officials, possible additions may include 311 calls for service and street closures.

The Citygram project is now managed by the Code for Charlotte, a brigade of Code for America. The brigade was established following last year’s Code for America’s 2014 Fellowship program, in which technologists from the organization worked with the city to strengthen open government-citizen relationships.

Posted by Amanda Ziadeh on Jun 11, 2015 at 10:37 AM


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