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NASA cubesat

NASA to give CubeSats a lift

Need to get your science project into space?   NASA is making room on upcoming launches for more CubeSats.

CubeSats, or nanosatellites, are cube-shaped satellites approximately four inches long, weighing about 3 pounds and usually carry scientific instruments for research.  To catch a ride on NASA launch vehicles, proposed CubeSat research must address an aspect of science, technology development, education, or operations encompassed by the space agency's strategic goals. The program is open to U.S. not-for-profits, accredited U.S. educational organizations and NASA's own research centers.

NASA will select candidates for launch or deployment on the International Space Station and negotiate agreements with those selected as manifest opportunities become available. Selection recommendation does not guarantee the availability of a launch opportunity, NASA stressed.

In support of the White House Maker Initiative, special consideration may be given to nanosatellites from organizations that have not previously been selected by the CubeSat Launch Initiative.

Selected participants will negotiate an agreement with NASA, which will provide integration and other services as necessary for launch. Collaborators will be responsible for securing funding for development of their CubeSat payload, and for participation in the CubeSat Launch Initiative.

Electronic proposals may be received until Nov. 24, 2015.

Posted by GCN Staff on Aug 07, 2015 at 9:07 AM


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