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Jackson joins the open data movement

Jackson, Miss., is the latest city to join the open data movement with the mayor’s signing of an executive order on open data on Sept. 1.

Mayor Tony T. Yarber is leading Jackson on its first steps towards open data by establishing data policies, standardizing practices and making key city datasets available internally and to city residents through an open data portal.

According to the announcement, the order includes incentives to make sure city staff understand the purpose of data collection, how to regularly collect and publish data and how to effectively make decisions based on the data.

Longer-term goals include linking open data to the city’s performance management dashboard, sharing open data updates with the public and stakeholders and creating an initial inventory of the city’s datasets.

The city’s open data policy is part of Jackson’s participation in What Works Cities, a national initiative through Bloomberg Philanthropies that helps cities open their data. Jackson is the first of the participating What Works Cities to sign an open data executive order.

Boston and New York City also recently published new open data policies in July. New York City’s rebranded “Open Data for All” focuses on how citizens can better understand and benefit from the data, and Boston’s “Open and Protected Data Policy” establishes a stronger set of standards for the city.  

Posted by Amanda Ziadeh on Sep 03, 2015 at 1:43 PM


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