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New Facebook emojis could support counterterrorism

New Facebook emojis could support counterterrorism

It just got easier for local law enforcement to learn  thing or two about crime and security risks by checking Facebook.

Until now, Facebook users who didn’t want to enter a written reply to a post were limited a thumbs-up or “like.” Now those options have expanded to include a heart and four emoji faces representing surprise, sadness, anger and laughter. Reveal News reported that use of emoji could provide law enforcement and intelligence agencies with new torrents of data for sentiment analysis of criminal and terrorism suspects.

Similar to the way Gmail monitors content in emails and search results to deliver targeted advertisements, police could analyze this new source of intelligence to pick up on feelings related to matters of national security

Some federal agencies already use social media-scraping software programs like SocioSpyder and Dunami to mine social sites and look for “networks of association, centers of influence and signs of radicalization,” according to Reveal News. And many police departments make Facebook a key part of their investigative and community-policing efforts.  The new emoji could make that analysis even easier.

Posted by Amanda Ziadeh on Mar 03, 2016 at 2:25 PM


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