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NYC library partners with Google to teach coding to kids

NYC library partners with Google to teach coding to kids

The Queens Library is partnering with Google to give free coding classes to more than 300 children across 26 locations in the New York borough. As a partner in the Google CS First program, which aims to increase student access and exposure to computer science, the library can expand its STEM activities and increase computer literacy in the community, library spokesman Joanne King told DNAinfo.

During the two-week programs designed for children between 9 and 14, students will learn the Scratch visual programming language that will then allow them to code projects in fashion, game design, music, animation and storytelling. In addition, 20 high school students will receive high school credit for learning the Google CS First curriculum and helping kids in the summer and fall programs.

The library previously partnered with Google in 2013, when the company donated 5,000 Nexus tablets for library patrons after Hurricane Sandy, Queens Library President and CEO Dennis Walcott said.

In addition to getting more kids interested in computer science, the program also aims to create more diversity in the tech industry by encouraging girls and minorities.

“Diversity is a big goal of ours and if we want more digital creators out there that look like New Yorkers, we need to go out and find them and inspire them,” William Floyd, Google's head of external affairs for New York and New Jersey, told the New York Daily News.

Posted by Derek Major on Jun 21, 2016 at 10:33 AM


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