Pulse

By GCN Staff

Blog archive
White House experiments with augmented reality

White House experiments with augmented reality

Not many people get to visit the White House, but thanks to a augmented reality application from the White House Historical Association, the experience is a little more accessible.

After downloading the app, titled 1600, users are prompted to pull out a $1 bill and point their phone or tablet’s camera at it.  Animations of the White House and surrounding lawn then pop up, and  Press Secretary Josh Earnest describes why the building is important.

There aren’t many practical applications for the 1600, but White House stressed the importance of trying out new technology.

“From hosting festivals on the South Lawn to allowing people to explore its rooms via Google Street View, President Obama has used traditional events and new technology to open up the doors of the White House to more Americans than ever before,” Earnest said in a statement.

Following this summer’s popularity of Pokemon Go, conversations began about how government could leverage the AR technology.

Pokemon Go could be used to increase civic participation by residents who could point out potholes or graffiti as they play the game, Miguel A. Gamiño Jr., the current CTO for New York City, wrote on Medium while he was serving as the CIO of San Francisco.

“If we think bigger,” Gamiño wrote, “it seems the potential is not the game itself, but rather the platform that’s using augmented reality to motivate a highly engaged base. What if the platform allowed local governments to add a digital layer to any streetscape? We could intentionally leverage it to communicate planned street closures, permitting applications for businesses, or a whole host of things we currently struggle to communicate for better interactions with our constituents.”

AR and virtual reality could play a big role in understanding data, Michael Thomas, a software architect at SAS, suggested. “By using VR and AR hardware and software to look at the information produced by visual analytics programs, the government could instantly map data into a representation inside of a virtual environment.”

Posted by Matt Leonard on Dec 06, 2016 at 9:54 AM


Featured

  • FCW Perspectives
    human machine interface

    Your agency isn’t ready for AI

    To truly take advantage, government must retool both its data and its infrastructure.

  • Cybersecurity
    secure network (bluebay/Shutterstock.com)

    Federal CISO floats potential for new supply chain regs

    The federal government's top IT security chief and canvassed industry for feedback on how to shape new rules of the road for federal acquisition and procurement.

  • People
    DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, shown here at her Nov. 8, 2017, confirmation hearing. DHS Photo by Jetta Disco

    DHS chief Nielsen resigns

    Kirstjen Nielsen, the first Homeland Security secretary with a background in cybersecurity, is being replaced on an acting basis by the Customs and Border Protection chief. Her last day is April 10.

Stay Connected

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.